Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Modeling after Major Surgery



As we grow older, we face an array of challenges that we never thought about in our youth.  Many of you are much older than I and have faced your challenges with dignity and grace.  I am now 57.  I had a tumor removed from my right CP angle (the space between your brainstem and inner ear, just below your brain) June 11th 2012.  Before the surgery, both the doctors and I were optimistic for a quick and complete recovery.  I even dragged my camera to Houston in anticipation of attending the Temple Santa Fe Railway Modeling and Historical Society convention two weeks later.  That was not to be.  The surgery was more complex than the MRI led them to believe.  They insulted a lot of my nerves scraping the tumor off, leaving me with stroke like symptoms.  Double vision, sagging face, slurred speech, loss of motor control and coordination on the right side, I was a mess.  Would I ever?  Insert a thousand questions here.  I couldn’t even type on my I phone.  But with the support of my wife, who fought to get me into the best rehab hospital around, the encouragement of a fellow modeler, and the dedicated staff of Houston Memorial Hermann TIRR, I made a lot of progress.  It helped that at my wife’s insistence, I wrote a document about who I was and what I had done before I ended up in intensive care.  I included pictures of the ram we had back on the farm, me working a cow on horseback, and the farm.  I wrote about my background as a pilot and engineer, mentioned my hobbies including model railroading and building scale models. And I laid out my goals.  With my speech problems and the number of specialists coming in, this was a quick way to let the doctors know that I wanted more than to retire to the couch in the condo.  Maybe I should have talked more about fine motor control, but I really needed to lift a 100 pound bale of hay.  Your goals will certainly differ.  I showed this document to the orderlies that helped me bathe too.  It really helped me make a connection with those who were trying to help me and in turn, they gave me a tailored boost to meet my goals. 

I left Houston in a wheel chair six weeks after my procedure.  My vision improved.  I was able to drive again.  Physical therapy helped me walk.  Occupational therapy helped me do important stuff like sort pills, make coffee, build freight cars.  Say what!  Yes, I started a Tichy flat and brought it to one of my OT appointments.  I got a lot more fine motor exercises after that and an assignment to keep working at it.  The stake pockets were a little too much for me at the time, and I shelved it for other projects after several attempts.  I’m now ready to finish it though, and have gone on to do other things.  Currently I am working on converting a Walthers 8-1-2 to a Santa Fe assigned Steam Ejector Air Conditioning equipped version.  I will explain how I did that conversion in future posts.

Meanwhile, health issues are not necessarily the end of the world as far as model railroading.  If you like ops, consider designing your next layout to be wheelchair accessible.  If you enjoy the camaraderie of an ops session, have the courage to continue to host as Gil Freitag from Houston has done.  His regular crew helps with the maintenance and all enjoy the ops sessions.  Depending on your and your family’s wishes, and the support of your ops crew, even death need not put an end to ops as Angus’ layout in Petaluma is still holding regular sessions.  Angus built and operated it from his wheel chair.  I never met him as he passed before I moved to the area, but I am grateful to him and his crew for sharing that vision with me.  One aspect of his design, the entry through an operating lift bridge, has direct applicability to my layout with the bascule bridge at Middle River.  The lower height is also attractive, both for showing to younger folk and accommodating me in older age if I ever need that chair again.  Persevere, have fun, and you may even get a prescription like the one I got from my cardiologist to reduce stress:  Do more model railroading!


John Barry
Cameron Park, CA

PS  If you want to see what I wrote from my hospital bed as an introduction to myself and goals, I uploaded a PDF here:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B6Ussn0SB6pfR1pUVk9VcURoVk0/edit?usp=sharing

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Brass Mystery Solved

Thanks to my fellow modelers the mysteries are no longer.

I now know what I purchased direct from Mr. Kim at Daeki back in 85.


Great Northern Steam Heater Car #3,  imported by Oriental.


New England Rail Service Boston & Main #104000 series wood caboose.



Many thanks to those of you who responded, including Don Valentine, the original caboose importer.


John Barry
Cameron Park, CA

Monday, March 17, 2014

Mystery Brass



Back in 1985 while stationed at Kunsan with the Air Force, I visited the Daeki Model Company’s factory in Seoul, Republic of Korea.  Mr. Kim was a very gracious host on my tour and I witnessed the assembly of beautiful models from piles of brass castings and sheet.  The patience of the assemblers amazed me as they worked in a chilly, not too brightly lit industrial building in downtown Seoul.  Their skills working with brass, still far exceed mine, and I am still in awe of their accomplishments.  At the end of the tour, Mr. Kim showed me several models that his company had produced.  I inquired if any of the models were available for sale.  He said yes and I selected four that returned to the states with me at the end of my tour.  He had no Santa Fe models at that time, so I selected a Southern Pacific MM-3 2-6-6-2, NYO&W Y-2 4-8-2, a caboose and a steam heater car.  The first two boxes had labels, but the second two did not.  I think Mr. Kim told me the prototypes, but my notes of that have disappeared as have my recollection of his words. 

I have since figured out that the Steam heater car was based on a Great Northern prototype.





The Caboose, I have and can recall no information on other than it was built by Daeki and so marked.






If you can identify the importer of either or the prototype for the caboose I would appreciate a comment or an e-mail at northbaylines at att dot net.

John Barry,

Cameron Park, CA

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Sale locos updated

I just uploaded photos to my sale loco post at
http://northbaylines.blogspot.com/2014/01/brass-and-plastic-locos-for-sale.html

I also have two unpainted Key 1400 class Atlantics that I am willing to trade for operating painted versions.

Please look at the updated post and give one or more of these deserving models a new home.


John Barry
Cameron Park, CA

Saturday, March 8, 2014

WWII Boxcar Graffiti and a Virginian Automobile Car



We tend to think of graffiti as a modern problem with taggers painting colorful trash on the sides of Hi-cube freight cars.  But bored individuals have been scrawling doodles on available surfaces since long before the invention of language, let alone the rattle can. 

I first saw a photo of one of the VGN auto cars in the box car collection of the City of Vancouver archives.  Walter Frost made the image on 16 November 1952 and I thought it was a cool looking car with its rounded roof edge.  Their website says the image is under copyright, so I’ll not post it here.  But the following is a link to the photo and full citation.  It has links to download a higher resolution image for your own personal use.  I include it because it shows the full car.


I checked my 53 ORER, and saw that there were only twenty five of these cars on the VGN.  Way too short of the one of 4800 foreign cars that I need to be a representative fleet on my nominal 400 car layout.  So I didn’t think too much more about it until several days later, I was browsing the Jack Delano collection at the Library of Congress.  Among all the neat shots of Santa Fe workers, vistas and trains were some detail shots taken in the San Bernardino yards.  Among them were two consecutive images of a Virginian Automobile Car. 





Full citation for this one is at http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/owi2001022902/PP/  It is in the public domain and you can obtain a higher resolution JPG and very high resolution TIFF through the links on the page at no cost.

This next picture is what really grabbed my attention though.  Some enterprising yard clerk must have had a soft spot for kitties and Alfred Hitchcock.  I had to model this car.



http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/owi2001022901/PP/ for the citation and links to hi-res.

Maybe it is too rare, but here I had two photos of this series in the west, bracketing my era, one of which was on my home road, ATSF, albeit in the LA basin rather than SF.  But with the Ford plant in the Richmond inner harbor, I will need an above free running mix number of Auto parts cars, so there is the justification, backed up with photos, one of which is too cool not to try to duplicate.  The hook was set, I’d taken the bait, but I had no idea how to land the fish.  Then I saw a post by Eldon Gatwood on the STMFC list about Bowser.  Needing about 14 PRR boxes and knowing that Bowser builds a LOT of Pennsy prototypes, I decided to give their website a gander.  I was looking for PRR boxes and gons, as I will need a lot of both.  They did not have much in stock, and most of that was in too new paint.  But when I opened the X32 page, I was floored.  In stock was the Virginian car that I had just been obsessing about.  Serendipity!  I ordered one before they ran out. 




Given the humongous VGN fleet of 25, I avoided the temptation to model the whole shebang and just got one as a representative.  I’m already stretching things by having one car or 4% of the VGN fleet when 0.02% is what is warranted if I stuck to the percentage of free rollers.  The car should arrive next week, along with a PRR X32 and gon.  Had to amortize the shipping costs.  Now to find a way to duplicate that chalk graffiti. . .

JOHN BARRY

Cameron Park, CA

Saturday, February 15, 2014

Railroad Maps from the 1945 Official Guide

                    



214 Railroad Maps from the 1945 Official Guide to the Railways

This work is to help me and other modelers figure out the relationships between the many railroads extant at the end of WWII, the period I model.  How did things get from New York to San Francisco?  Mostly they went via Chicago or St. Louis as the following maps illustrate.  The Official Guide contains listings for all the railroads and shipping companies transporting freight or passengers, along with the passenger schedules.  Many companies placed maps of their systems with their listings.  Their marketing departments usually drafted these maps, so there can be certain distortions that make the owner’s line look superior to the competition.  Some of the small roads emphasized their connections to the continent.  Delusions of Grandeur or a Desperate Sell?  It’s interesting to note which connecting lines show up on whose maps.  Some roads had friendly connections and steered each other business, sometimes they were fierce competitors, sometimes they were either depending on which city they were serving. 

The map pages were extracted from the 1945 Official Guide and not edited other than to add an alphabetical index, pp i-v; table of contents, vi-x; and bookmarks to selected roads. 

The reporting marks column in the index and contents is based on the 1953 Official Register of Railway Equipment.

You can find the document on Google Drive at:


It is a large file at 32MB

And why did this ATSF modeler choose the BCE map above as the teaser image?

Turns out that  a lot of alcohol destined to Richmond's Lawrence Warehouse for the Russians during WWII originated at distilleries served by the BCE and routed south via GN SP Stockton ATSF or NP SP.  



JOHN BARRY
15 February 2014

Cameron Park, CA

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

USN ships built in the Kaiser Richmond yard 4

This post is related to the railroad only in that the materials for these ships moved to Richmond on the Santa Fe and Southern Pacific.  What follows are the official histories of the ships commissioned into the Navy during WWII that Kaiser built in yard 4 at the head of the Santa Fe channel in the Richmond inner harbor.  Small Patrol Frigates and Landing Ship Tank, they played an important part in the war, even if it was in support of larger operations.  One unique aspect of these ships is that a war emergency yard that did not exist a year before she was laid down built the lead ship in the PF-3 Class.  A tribute to the men and women who poured their all into the war effort at Richmond.

John Barry
Cameron Park, CA

USN ships built in the Kaiser Richmond yard 4

LST-476

LST-476 was laid down on 5 August 1942 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser Co., Inc.; launched on 10 October 1942; and commissioned on 4 April 1943, Lt. W. J. Steffens, USNR, in command.

During World War II, LST-476 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Gilbert Islands operation—November and December 1943
Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls—February 1944
Hollandia operation—April 1944
Capture and occupation of Guam—July and August 1944
Cape Sansapor operation—August 1944

Following the war, LST-476 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early February 1946. Upon her return to the United States, LST-476 was decommissioned on 12 February 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 31 October 1947. On 1 June 1948, the ship was sold to the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co., of Seattle, Wash., and subsequently scrapped.

LST-476 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST-477

LST-477 was laid down on 12 August 1942 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser, Inc.; launched on 29 October 1942; and commissioned on 19 February 1942, Lt. Josiah K, Adams, USNR, in command.

During World War II, LST-477 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Gilbert Islands operation—November and December 1943
Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls—February 1944
Capture and occupation of Guam—July 1944
Assault and occupation of Iwo Jima—February 1945

Following the war, LST-477 was redesignated LST(H)-477 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-February 1946. She returned to the United States and was struck from the Navy list on 28 August 1947. On 27 March 1948, the ship was sold to Consolidated Builders, Inc., of Seattle, Wash., and subsequently scrapped.

LST-477 earned four battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War II service.

LST-478

LST-478 was laid down on 17 August 1942 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser, Inc.; launched on 7 November 1942; and commissioned on 13 March 1943, Lt. H. F. Holmshaw in command.

During World War II, LST-478 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Gilbert Island operation—November and December 1943
Hollandia operation—April 1944
Capture and occupation of Guam—July 1944
Leyte landings—October 1944
Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto—April 1945

Following the war, LST-478 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-March 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 23 March 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 28 August 1947. On 25 March 1948, the ship was sold to Consolidated Builders, Inc., Seattle, Wash., for scrapping.

LST-478 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST-479

LST-479 was laid down on 25 August 1942 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser, Inc.; launched on 4 October 1942; and commissioned on 19 April 1943.

During World War II, LST-479 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Gilbert Islands operation—November and December 1943
Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls—February 1944
Hollandia operation—April 1944
Capture and occupation of Guam—July 1944
Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto—March and April 1945

Following the war, LST-479 returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 28 February 1946 and was struck from the Navy list on 28 March that same year. On 16 April 1948, the ship was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., Bethlehem, Pa., and subsequently scrapped.

LST-479 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST-480

LST-480 was laid down on 31 August 1942 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser, Inc.; launched on 29 October 1942; and commissioned on 3 May 1943.

During World War II, LST-480_ was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the Gilbert Islands operation in November and December 1943 and the occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls in February 1944. The ship was lost through an accident on 21 May 1944. She was struck from the Navy list on 18 July 1944.

LST-480 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-481

LST-481 was laid down on 4 September 1942 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser, Inc.; launched on 2 December 1942; and commissioned on 15 May 1943.

During World War II, LST-481 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Gilbert Islands operation—November and December 1943
Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls—January and February 1944
Hollandia operation—April 1944
Capture and occupation of Guam—July 1944
Assault and occupation of Iwo Jima—February 1945
Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto—April 1945

Following the war, LST-481 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-November 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 28 February 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 12 April 1946. On 16 April 1948, the ship was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., Bethlehem, Pa., and subsequently scrapped.

LST-481 earned six battle stars for World War II service.

LST-482

LST-482 was laid down on 14 September 1942 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser, Inc.; launched on 17 December 1942; and commissioned on 20 March 1943, Lt. R. L. Eddy, USNR, in command.

During World War II, LST-482 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Gilbert Islands operation—November and December 1943 Occupation  of  Kwajalein  and  Majuro  Atolls—

January and February 1944 Hollandia operation—April 1944 Capture and occupation of Guam—July 1944 Leyte landings—October 1944 Lingayen Gulf landing—January 1945 Following the war, LST-482  was  redesignated LSTH-482on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East in November and December 1945. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 23 February 1946 and redesignated LST-482 on 6 March 1952. The tank landing ship was subsequently named Branch County (LST-482) on 1 July 1955 after a county in Michigan. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 11 August 1955. In early March 1956, the ship was sunk by naval gunfire and submarine-launched torpedoes in an exercise off San Diego, Calif.

LST-482 earned six battle stars for World War II service.

LST-483

LST-483 was laid down on 21 September 1942 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser, Inc.; launched on 30 December 1942; and commissioned on 3 May 1943.

During World War II, LST-483 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Capture and occupation of Saipan—June and July 1944
Tinian capture and occupation—July 1944
Leyte landings—October 1944
Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto—April 1945

Following the war, LST-483 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early February 1946. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 10 February 1946. The tank landing ship was redesignatedBrewster County (LST-483) on 1 July 1955 after a county in Texas. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 11 August 1955, and she was later sunk as a target.

LST-483 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-484

LST-484 was laid down on 28 September 1942 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser, Inc.; launched on 2 January 1943; and commissioned on 23 April 1943.

During World War II, LST-484 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Gilbert Islands operation:
(a) Occupation of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls—February 1944
(b) Occupation of Eniwetok Atoll—February and March 1944
Capture and occupation of Saipan—June and July 1944
Tinian capture and occupation—July 1944
Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto—March through June 1945

Following the war, LST-484 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-February 1946. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 27 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 28 August that same year. On 13 December 1947, the ship was sold to Kaiser Co., Inc., Seattle, Wash., and subsequently scrapped.

LST-484 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST-485

LST-485 was laid down on 17 December 1942 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser, Inc.; launched on 9 January 1943; and commissioned on 19 May 1943.

During World War II, LST-485 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Vella-Lavella occupation—September 1943
Treasury Island landings—October through November 1943
Capture and occupation of Saipan—June and August 1944
Tinian capture and occupation—July and August 1944
Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto—May through June 1945

Following the war, LST-485 saw China service in January and February 1946 and performed occupation duty in the Far East until early March 1946. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 30 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 28 August that same year. On 29 March 1948, the ship was sold to Kaiser Co., Inc., Seattle, Wash., and subsequently scrapped.

LST-485 earned five battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War II service.

LST-486

LST-486 was laid down on 31 December 1942 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser, Inc.; launched on 16 January 1943; and commissioned on 29 May 1943.

During World War II, LST-486 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Capture and occupation of Saipan—June and July 1944
Tinian capture and occupation—July 1944
Leyte landings—October 1944
Lingayen Gulf landing—January 1945

Following the war, LST-486 was redesignated LSTH-486 on 15 September 1945. She performed occupation duty in the Far East until early January 1946. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 13 January 1946. The tank landing ship was operated by the Shipping Control Authority, Japan, until destroyed on 23 July 1947. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 28 August 1947.

LST-486 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-487

LST-487 was laid down on 2 January 1943 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser, Inc.; launched on 23 January 1943; and commissioned on 27 April 1943.

During World War II, LST-487 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Capture and occupation of Saipan—June and July 1944
Tinian capture and occupation—July 1944
Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands—September and October 1944
Lingayen Gulf landing—January 1945
Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto—May 1945

Following the war, LST-487 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 15 March 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 1 May that same year. On 20 February 1948, the ship was sold to Brown & Root, of Houston, Tex., for merchant service.

LST-487 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST-488

LST-488 was laid down on 11 January 1943 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser, Inc.; launched on 5 March 1943; and commissioned on 24 May 1943.

During World War II, LST-488 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations:

Occupation and defense of Cape Torokina—November 1943
Capture and occupation of Guam—July 1944
Leyte landing—October 1944
Lingayen Gulf landing—January 1945

Following the war, LST-488 was redesignated LSTH-488 on 15 September 1945 and performed occupation duty in the Far East until early January 1946. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 11 January 1946. She was redesignated LST-488 on 6 March 1952 and served with the Military Sea Transportation Service as USNS LST-488 in the postwar period. The ship was transferred to the Republic of  the  Philippines  as  a  lease  on  15  July  1972.

LST-488 earned four battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War II service

LST-489

LST-489 was redesignated ARL-2 and named Amy-cus (q.v.) on 13 January 1943.

LST-490

LST-490 was redesignated ARL-3 and named Agenor (q.v.) on 13 January 1943.

Tacoma


A city and port on the coast of Puget Sound in the west central part of the state of Washington. Tacoma is the seat of Pierce County.

III

(PF-3: dp. 1,430; 1. 303'11"; b. 37'6"; dr. 13'8"; s. 20.3 k. (tl.) ; cpl. 190; a. 3 3", 4 40mm., 9 20mm., 2 dct, 8 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.) ; cl. Tacoma)



The third Tacoma was laid down at Richmond, Calif., on 10 March 1943 by Kaiser Cargo, Inc., under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1421) as PG-111; redesignated PF-3 on 15 April 1943; named Tacoma on 5 May 1943; launched on 7 July 1943; sponsored by Mrs. A. R. Bergersen; and commissioned on 6 November 1943, Lt. Comdr. Adrian F. Werner, USCG, in command.

After completing shakedown training off the California coast in December, Tacoma reported for duty as a training ship in January 1944. She trained prospective frigate crews until 27 June, when she was ordered to proceed to Alaskan waters upon completion of sea trials. However, she was plagued by unsuccessful trials and a boiler room fire and, consequently, did not report for duty at Kodiak, Alaska, until 21 October. For the next four months,Tacoma conducted antisubmarine patrols and escorted supply ships and transports along the Alaskan coast and between the various islands of the Aleutians chain, visiting Attu, Adak, Dutch Harbor, and other smaller Alaskan ports.

On 23  February 1945,  she departed  Dutch Harbor and sailed south .for an extensive overhaul—first at San Francisco, then at Bremertown, Wash.—to prepare her for transfer to the Soviet Union. On 10 July, the frigate returned to Alaska, at Cold Bay, and began familiarization training with her prospective Russian crew. She was decommissioned at Cold Bay on 16 August and transferred to the Soviet Navy, in which she served over four years as EK-12.

The frigate was returned to the United States on 16 October 1949 at Yokosuka, Japan. She remained there out of commission, in a caretaker status, until the outbreak of hostilities in Korea late in June 1950. She began preparations for activation in August and went back into commission on 1 December at Yokosuka. The next day, she began 15 days of shakedown training out of Yokosuka in Sagami Wan and Tokyo Bay. From the 18th to the 25th, she underwent post-shakedown availability at Yokosuka and put to sea the following day bound for Sasebo, Japan. On the 28th, Tacoma headed for the east coast of Korea.

For the next few months, the frigate operated with the UN Blockading and Escort Squadron, Task Force (TF) 95. On 30 January 1951, she joined in the bombardment phase of the amphibious feint at Kansong; and, the following afternoon, she performed the same duty at Kosong. She put in at Pusan on 1 February, then headed for Sasebo two days later. By 5 February, she was back off Korea's eastern coast at Kangnung for a two-day bombardment mission there. On the 7th and 8th, her gunners trained their sights on Yangyang, and then on Hwangpo on the 9th and 10th. When not pounding Hwangpo, Tacoma patrolled off Chikute Island. She returned to Sasebo on 13 February and remained there until the 19th, when she headed for Won-san harbor in North Korea. She arrived off Wonsan on 22 February and, for the next four days, joined in the operations which resulted in the successful landing of 110 Re.public of Korea marines on Sin Do on the 24th. The following day, Tacoma cleared Wonsan channel to return to Sasebo. She arrived at Sasebo on 27 February and remained there until 10 March, when she got underway for Yokosuka and a restricted availability which lasted until 23 April.

On 3 April 1951, the United States Naval Forces, Far East (NavFE) organization was restructured. As a result, the Service Forces, previously fragmented among separate 7th Fleet and NavFE groups, were consolidated into a new Logistics Group, designated TF 92. When Tacoma emerged from the yard at Yokosuka in late April, she was assigned to the new task organization as an escort; and she served in that capacity for the remainder of her United States naval career. From then until September, the frigate escorted supply ships between Japanese and Korean ports and to stations along the Korean coast where she replenished Allied warships. She also conducted antisubmarine patrols and participated in occasional shore bombardments.

On 9 October 1951, Tacoma was transferred to the Republic of Korea (ROK). She served in the ROK Navy as Taedong (PF-63) until 28 February 1973, when she was decommissioned and returned to the United States Navy. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 2 April 1973, and she was subsequently donated to the ROK Navy as a museum and training ship.

Tacoma earned three battle stars during the Korean War.

Sausalito

A city in California.

(PF-4: dp. 1,430; l. 303'11"; b. 37'6"; dr. 13'8"; s. 20 k.; cpl. 176; a. 3 3", 4 40mm., 2 dct., 8 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.); cl. Tacoma; T. S2-S2-AQ1)

Sausalito (PF-4) was laid down on 7 April 1943 as PG-112 under a Maritime Commission contract by Kaiser Cargo, Inc., Richmond, Calif.; reclassified PF-4 on 15 April 1943; launched on 20 July 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Richard Shaler; and commissioned on 4 March 1944, Comdr. Edward A. Eve, USCG, in command.

After shakedown, Sausalito arrived at Adak, Alaska, on 5 October 1944 for convoy escort duty in the Alaskan Sea Frontier. She performed these duties until departing on 5 June 1945 for overhaul at Seattle. On 16 August 1945, she was decommissioned at Cold Harbor, Alaska, and transferred to the Soviet Union under Lend Lease as EK-13.

The ship was returned to United States custody by the Soviet Union on 1 November 1949 and was placed in reserve in Japan. With the outbreak of the Korean War, additional escort vessels were needed; and, on 15 September 1950, Sausalito was recommissioned at Yokosuka, Japan, Lt. Comdr. Francis W. Deily in command. On 26 November, she departed Yokosuka for Hungnam, North Korea. There, until 24 December 1950, she performed harbor control duties which included escorting ships through the mineswept channel, passing instructions to ships entering the harbor, patrolling the entrance against hostile craft and drifting mines, and conducting shore bombardment when required. Between February and May 1951, her assignments included escorting battleship, Missouri (BB-63), on her shore bombardment station, blockade patrols and shore bombardment on the east coast of North Korea from Wonsan to Chongjin, and harbor control duty at Wonsan, broken by periods of upkeep at Sasebo and Yokosuka. During the period from June to August, she escorted underway replenishment groups off the Korean coast.

After drydocking and upkeep at Yokosuka, Sausalito sailed for the Philippines in October. In late November and early December, she conducted a patrol against unauthorized fishing vessels in the Sonsorol Islands in the Western Carolines, apprehending one vessel. After Christmas in Subic Bay, she made a good-will tour to Saigon, Bangkok, Singapore, and Penang. February found her back in Korean waters, where she resumed escort and patrol duties before returning to Yokosuka for the last time under the United States flag on 31 May. On 9 June 1952, Sausalito was decommissioned and on 4 September was transferred, on loan, to the Republic of Korea as Jmchin (PF-66). She replaced the Korean ship Apnok, ex-USS Rockford (PF-48), which had been irreparably damaged in a collision on 21 May 1951.

Sausalito earned six battle stars for her Korean War service.

Hoquiam

A coastal city in Washington.

(PF-5: dp. 1,430; l. 303'11" ; b. 37'6"; dr. 13'8" ; s. 20 k.; cpl. 190; a. 3 3", 4 40mm., 9 20mm., 8 dcp., 1 dcp. (h.h.), 2 dct.; cl. Tacoma; T. S2-S2-AQ1)

Hoquiam (PF-5) was laid down under Maritime Commission contract by Kaiser Cargo, Inc., Yard 4, Richmond, Calif., 10 April 1943; launched 31 July 1943; sponsored by Miss Helen Philbrick; and commissioned 8 May 1944, Lt. Comdr. P. B. Trimble, USCG, in command.

After shakedown off the coast of southern California, Hoquiam departed San Francisco 20 August, steamed via Seattle, and arrived Kodiak, Alaska, 27 August for duty with the Alaskan Sea Frontier. During the remainder of the war, she patrolled island waters along the Alaskan coast. After returning to Seattle for overhaul during June, 1945, she decommissioned at Cold Bay, Alaska, 16 August and transferred to Russia under lend-lease the same day.

Returned to the U.S. Navy 1 November 1949 at Yokosuka, Japan, Hoquiam recommissioned 27 September 1950, Lt. Comdr. B. A. Lane in command. Following a brief shakedown, she sailed to join IB the repulse of Communist aggression in South Korea. Arriving oft Wonsan, Korea, 25 October, she served as a harbor control and screening ship during amphibious landings. For the next 2 months she performed patrol, escort, harbor control, and communications duties along the northeastern coast of Korea.

In late December Hoquiam assisted with harbor control operations during the evacuation at Hungnam before sailing for Japan. Arriving Yokosuka 30 December, she underwent a brief overhaul, then served as a drone target ship off the coast of Japan from late January until early March 1951. She returned to Korean waters 8 March and over the next 6 months operated along the east coast of Korea from Wonsan to Songjin. She participated in interdiction and harassment patrols, designed to destroy enemy coastal shipping. In addition she conducted ASW operations off Wonsan and bombarded enemy shore installations and coastal supply routes.

While engaging enemy shore positions 7 May, Hoquiam was hit by Communist gunfire. She returned to Japan, arriving Yokosuka 16 May for repairs. Following repairs, she sailed 4 June via Sasebo to Wonsan where she arrived 10 June to resume bombardment and interdiction duty. She continued patrolling the eastern coast until September. After returning to Yokosuka 9 September, she decommissioned 8 October and was leased to the Republic of Korea. She serves the Korean Navy as Nae Tong (PF-65).

Hoquiam received five battle stars for Korean war service.

Pasco

A city in Washington.

(PF–6: dp. 1,430; l. 303’1”; b. 37’6”; dr. 13’8”; s. 20.3 k.; Cpl. 190; a. 3 3”; cl. Tacoma; T. S2–S2–AQ1)

Pasco (PF–6) was laid down as M.C. hull 1424, 7 July 1943 by Kaiser Cargo Co., Inc., Richmond, Calif.; launched 17 August 1943; sponsored by Miss Myrna Olson; and commissioned 15 April 1944.

After shakedown Pasco reported to San Francisco 25 May, and continued patrol operations in the San Francisco-San Diego area until reporting to Kodiak to join the Alaskan Sea Frontier 15 October. In January 1945, she returned to Seattle and guarded the northern Pacific coast.

After war-time service, the ship was leased to Russia in August 1945 and continued operations with that power until 1950, when she returned to the United States and went into reserve. Loaned to Japan in 1953, the frigate was struck from the Naval Vessel Register 1 December 1961. In 1964, the ship was given to Japan and continues operations with the Japanese as Kashi into 1970.

Albuquerque

A city in central New Mexico, located on the Rio Grande about 55 miles southwest of Santa Fe. Albuquerque is the seat of government for Bernalillo County.

I

(PF-7: dp. 1,430; 1. 303'11"; b. 37'6"; dr. 13'8"; s. 20.3 k. (tl.); cpl. 190; a. 3 3", 4 40mm., 4 20mm., 8 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.), 2 dct.; cl. Tacoma; T. S2-S2-AQ1)

The first Albuquerque (PF-7) was laid down under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1425) on 20 July 1943 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser Cargo, Inc.; launched on 14 September 1943; sponsored by Mrs. B. L. Livingstone; and commissioned on 20 December 1943, Lt. Comdr. Wayne L. Goff, USCG, in command.

After outfitting and shakedown training, Albuquerque stood out from Treasure Island, Calif., on 24 March 1944 bound for Seattle, Wash. She arrived two days later and remained there until getting underway on 5 April as an escort for an Alaska-bound convoy. She and her convoy arrived in Dutch Harbor, Alaska, on 16 April where the frigate was assigned to Escort Division (CortDiv) 27. For the rest of 1944 and the first half of1945, Albuquerque shepherded convoys between various Alaskan ports and conducted patrols around the Aleutian Islands and in the Bering Sea. Between 5 June and 14 July 1945, the warship made a round-trip voyage from Dutch Harbor to Seattle and back. She then resumed her previous duty for a month before being decommissioned at Cold Bay, Alaska, on 16 August. The following day, she was transferred to the Soviet Union under lend-lease.

After over four years of service with the Soviet Navy, Albuquerque was returned to the United States Navy on 15 November 1949 at Yokosuka, Japan. Following repairs and refurbishment, the frigate was recommissioned at Yokosuka on 3 October 1950, Lt. Comdr. Claude 0. Lowe in command. For the next 10 months, she escorted convoys and conducted patrols between Yokosuka, Hong Kong, and Singapore. In August 1951, she operated between Yokosuka and Subic Bay in the Philippine Islands. She departed Yokosuka on 10 September 1951; stopped at Sasebo; and, on the 15th, got underway for patrol and escort duty along the eastern coast of Korea. As a unit of CortDiv 5, Destroyer Flotilla (DesFlot) 3, Pacific Fleet, Albuquerque spent the rest of September and most of October operating along the Korean coast.

She concluded that duty on 26 October 1951 when she departed Sasebo bound for Hong Kong. She arrived in that British colony on 30 September and remained there—presumably in some sort of station ship status—until the following March. On 6 March 1952, Albuquerque stood out of Hong Kong, bound for the Philippines. From Subic Bay, Luzon, she headed back to Japan, returning to Sasebo on 16 May. Based there, the frigate resumed patrol and escort duties along the eastern coast of Korea. That assignment lasted for about six weeks. In July, she again visited Subic Bay and, on the 26th, arrived back in Hong Kong. The warship once more made an extended visit to Hong Kong until finally departing in mid-November. After a visit to Subic Bay, she returned to Sasebo on 3 December and resumed duty along the eastern coast of Korea.

On 28 February 1953, Albuquerque was decommissioned at Yokosuka. On 30 November 1953, she was transferred to Japan on a loan basis. She was commissioned in the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force as Tochi (PF-16).Albuquerque's name was struck from the Navy list on 1 December 1961, but she was returned briefly to United States Navy custody on 28 August 1962. However, almost simultaneously, the frigate was permanently retransferred to Japan. She served in the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force until sometime in 1968 when she was sunk as a target. Albuquerque earned three battle stars during the Korean conflict.

Everett

A city in the State of Washington.

(PF-8: dp. 1,264; l. 303'11"; b. 37'6"; dr. 13'8"; s. 20 k.; cpl. 190; a. 3 3"; cl. Tacoma)

Everett was launched on 29 September 1943 by Kaiser Cargo Inc., Richmond, Calif.; sponsored by Mrs. Cornelia M. Fitch; and commissioned on 22 January 1944, Lieutenant Commander W. L. Davis, USCG, in command.

After shakedown and training, Everett sailed north to Adak, Alaska, arriving 22 April 1944 and began 16 months of arduous patrol and escort duty in the stormy waters of the Aleutian chain. Decommissioned 16 August 1945 at Cold Bay, Alaska, the frigate was transferred to the USSR under lend lease.

Returned to the United States Navy on 15 November 1949, Everett was given an extensive overhaul at Yokosuka, Japan, where she was recommissioned on 26 July 1950. Assigned to primary duty as station ship at Hong Kong, the frigate also joined the United Nations Blockading and Escort Force in operations off both coasts of Korea. On 3 July 1951 while bombarding Wonsan, North Korea, Everett was hit by fire from a shore battery; one man was killed and seven were wounded, but damage to the ship was light.

On 10 March 1953, Everett was decommissioned at Yokosuka and lent to Japan. Following her return to the U.S. Navy she was stricken from the Navy List on 1 December 1961.

Everett received four battle stars for Korean war service.

Pocatello

A city in Bannock County, southeast Idaho.

(PF–9: dp. 2,415; l. 303’11”; b. 37’6”; dr. 12’; s. 20 k.; cpl. 180; a. 3 3”, 4 40mm.; cl. Tacoma; T. S2–S2–AQ1)

Pocatello (PF–9), a patrol frigate, originally classified as a PG, was laid down 17 August 1943 at Kaiser Yard No. 4, Richmond, Calif.; launched 17 October 1943; sponsored by Miss Thelma Dixey, a great-granddaughter of Chief Pocatello; manned by a Coast Guard crew; and commissioned at Richmond 18 February 1944, Lt. Comdr. S. G. Guill, USCG, in command.

After fitting out at General Engineering and Drydock Co., Alameda, Calif. and shakedown out of San Diego through 28 April, Pocatello was assigned to Commander, Western Sea Frontier, and directed to commence weather station operations out of Seattle, Wash. Departing San Francisco 17 May, she arrived Seattle 22 June. One month later she commenced her first patrol on Weather Station Able.

Pocatello’s weather station was approximately 1,500 miles west of Seattle. Patrols consisted of thirty days at sea followed by ten days in port at Seattle. Pocatello alternated on station with the Coast Guard cutter Haida, and had completed a dozen patrols by the war’s end. Pocatello was then laid up on the west coast. Scheduled for disposal, she shifted to Charleston, S.C., arriving 6 April 1946 and decommissioning there 2 May. Pocatello was subsequently sold at Charleston to J. C. Berkwit and Co. of New York.

Brownsville

A city in the far southern tip of Texas on the Rio Grande opposite Matamoros, Mexico. It is the seat of government for Cameron County.
(PF-10: dp. 1,430; l. 303'11"; b. 37'6"; dr. 13'8"; s. 20.3 k. (tl.); cpl. 190; a. 3 3", 4 40mm., 4 20mm., 8 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.), 2 dct.; cl. Tacoma, T. S2-S2-AQ1)
Brownsville (PF-10) was laid down on 14 September 1943 at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser Cargo, Inc., under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1428); launched on 14 November 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Lillian Runyon Gurney; and commissioned on 6 May 1944, Comdr. Hollis M. Warner, USCG, in command.

Brownsville completed outfitting at Richmond between 6 May and 19 June. On the latter day, the patrol frigate headed south to San Diego whence she engaged in a month of shakedown training. On 21 July, she completed that training and began post-shakedown availability at Alameda and Oakland, Calif. After several extensions, she completed her repair period near the end of September and reported for duty at San Diego on 28 September.

Brownsville spent her entire, brief Navy career assigned to the Commander, Western Sea Frontier. From September 1944 to April 1945, she served in the Southern California Sector, operating out of San Diego. She conducted barrier patrols and escorted coastal shipping in addition to amphibious training and antisubmarine warfare exercises. After April 1945, the patrol frigate moved to the Northern California Sector and, after a brief assignment patrolling off the entrance to San Francisco Bay, began weather patrols and planeguard duty out of San Francisco. That duty, punctuated by repair periods at Treasure Island, lasted until 15 April 1946 when she was decommissioned, turned over to the Coast Guard on a loan basis, and commissioned as USCGC Brownsville.

The Coast Guard made use of her only until the following August. On 2 August 1946, she was decommissioned once more and later returned to the Navy. Declared surplus to the needs of the Navy, Brownsville was berthed at Seattle, Wash., for more than a year. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 25 September 1946, and she was sold to the Franklin Shipwrecking Co. on 30 September 1947 for scrapping.

Grand Forks

A city in North Dakota.

(PF-11: dp. 1,246; l. 304'; b. 38'; dr. 12'; s. 20 k.; cpl. 141 a. 3 3" 2 40mm.; cl. Tacoma)

Grand Forks was launched by Kaiser Co., Richmond, Calif.; 27 November 1943, Mrs. T. H. Thoreson sponsor. She commissioned 18 March 1944, Lit. Comdr. Christian W. Peterson, USCG, in command.

After shakedown, 7 August 1944 Grand Forks sailed from San Francisco to take station in the Northern Pacific off the California coast as a plane guard ship, returning to San Francisco 3 September. She continued on this duty until decommissioning, spending an average of 3 weeks at sea and 2 in port. Late in the night 11 October 1944 Grand Forks picked up a distress call from a PB2Y about to make an emergency landing. Sending up flares and star shells to guide the plane through the dark, Grand Forks rescued 15 crewmen and passengers from the sea, as well as 114 sacks of mail.

While in port from guard duty on 31 May 1945, Grand Forks was toured by several members of the American delegation to the San Francisco Peace Conference, including Secretary of State and Mrs. Edward Stettinius, Nelson Rockefeller, and Alger Hiss.

She continued on plane guard duty until 19 March 1946 and then sailed from San Francisco to Charleston, S.C., where she decommissioned 16 May 1946. Grand Forks was stricken from the Navy Register 19 June 1946; sold to J. C. Berkwit & Co. of New York 19 May 1947, and scrapped 1 November 1947.

Casper

Casper is a city in Wyoming.

(PF-12: dp. 1,264; l. 303'11"; b. 37'6"; dr. 13'8"; s. 20 k.; cpl. 190; a. 3 3"; cl. Tacoma)

Casper (PF-12) was launched 27 December 1943 by Kaiser Cargo Co., Richmond, Calif., under a Maritime Commission contract; sponsored by Mrs. E. J. Spaulding; commissioned 31 March 1944, Lieutenant Commander F. J. Scheiber, USCG, in command; and reported to the Western Sea Frontier.

Casper sailed from San Francisco 30 September 1944 for a weather patrol out of Seattle, returning to San Francisco 6 November. From this base, she operated as plane guard, and on weather patrol, performing these vital functions between the mainland and Pearl Harbor. During the organizing conference of the United Nations at San Francisco, which began 25 April 1945, Casper made two security patrols off the Farallon Islands.

Casper cleared San Francisco 4 April 1946 for Charleston, S.C., where she was decommisioned 16 May 1946. The patrol escort was sold 20 May 1947.

Pueblo

The second Pueblo was named for the city in Colorado.
II
(PF-13: displacement 2,415; length 303'11"; beam 37'6"; draft 13'8"; speed 20 knots; complement 190; armament 3 3-inch, 4 40-millimeter, 9 20 millimeter, 2 depth charge tracks, one depth charge projector (Hedgehog); classTacoma; type S2-S2-AQ1)
The second Pueblo (PF-13) was laid down on 14 November 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract (MC Hull No. 1431) at Richmond, Calif., by Kaiser Cargo Inc., Yard No.4; launched on 20 January 1944; and sponsored by Seaman 2nd Class Carol June Barnhart, USN (W), "the first girl in Pueblo [Colorado] to enlist in the WAVES." Pueblo experienced engine difficulties during her first two trials that prompted the Navy sub-board of inspection and survey to recommend (on 20 and 27 April 1944) non-acceptance "until the cause is determined and corrected."Ultimately, after the third trial, the sub-board recommended (25 May 1944) accepting the ship, and she was commissioned at her building yard on 27 May 1944, Comdr. Donald T. Adams, USCG, in command.
Shifting to the Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, Calif., on 29 May 1944, Pueblo underwent outfitting and the completion of class items until 31 August. After conducting trial runs on that day and on 1-2 September, she compensated her compasses in the southern waters of San Francisco Bay on 3 September, mooring at Treasure Island, Calif., upon completion of that evolution. After calibrating her radio direction finder (RDF) on 5 September, she moored at Alameda, then sailed for San Diego, Calif., on the 7th. Reaching her destination on the morning of 9 September, Pueblo began shakedown training on 9 September, and carried out that work under the direction of the San Diego Shakedown Group, Fleet Operational Training Command, Pacific, until completing it at 0900 on 8 October. Underway immediately for San Francisco for a ten-day post-shakedown availability, she entered San Francisco harbor the next evening, mooring to the North Pier at Treasure Island. Shifting to the General Engineering Shipyard, Alameda, the following afternoon, Pueblo underwent post-shakedown availability until 24 October, when she shifted to the U.S. Coast Guard Training Station Pier, Alameda. She took on ammunition at the Naval Ammunition Depot, Mare Island, on the 25th, mooring at Treasure Island soon thereafter.
Reporting to Commander, Western Sea Frontier, on 26 October 1944, for duty, Pueblo - fitted out with highly sensitive meteorological instruments to enable her to operate as a weather tracking ship - received orders later the same day to report to the frontier's Northern California sector. Standing out of San Francisco Harbor on 28 October, she set course for Plane Guard Station No.2, and relieved the patrol vessel Argus (PY-14) on 31 October, the day after the latter vessel had located and rescued the 61 survivors of the freighter John A. Johnson, that had been torpedoed by Japanese submarine I-12 the day before. The Liberty Ship had been abandoned when she broke in two. In a brutal attack that resulted in the killing of 4 of the 41 merchant sailors, the Army security officer and 4 of the 28-man U.S. Navy Armed Guard detachment assigned to the ship, I-12 had then surfaced and shelled the wreck, setting both halves ablaze. The submarine then had bore down on the lifeboats and rafts, the Japanese sailors firing on them with machine guns and pistols. While Argus proceeded to port with the freighter's survivors, Pueblo steamed to investigate a reported oil slick and debris during the first dog watch the next day (1 November). She found nothing upon her arrival in the area.
For over a fortnight, Pueblo maneuvered as necessary on various courses and speeds to stay on Plane Guard Station No.2, and punctuated that period of time with drills in first aid, plane guard, damage control, ASW, and gunnery, as well as exercising the ready gun crews and the main battery gun crews in operation of the ship's Hedgehog mount. On 19 November 1944, however, the report of a submarine trailing a friendly ship at 30°28.0'N, 140°10.5'W prompted Commander, Western Sea Frontier, to order Pueblo, as well as three California-bound destroyers, Harrison (DD-573), Murray (DD-576) and John Rodgers (DD-574), to the area to investigate. During the first watch on 19 November, the frigate began a submarine search as that period began, then joined Murray a half hour into the watch. While Harrison and John Rodgers bent on speed to overtake the vessel that had reported being shadowed, Puebloexecuted a sound search pattern in company with Murray during the mid watch on the 20th, then joined the other two destroyers the following morning. The four ships formed a scouting line and swept the vicinity where the submarine had been reported sighted during the forenoon watch and into the afternoon, but without result. A second submarine sighting (31°12.0'N, 139°39'W), however, prompted the quartet to leave the scene of the first at 1407. Reaching the scene of the second sighting at 1830, the ships swept through that area with negative results, with Pueblo holding down the right flank of the scouting line.
Pueblo steamed off "to proceed on duty assigned"a half hour before the end of the morning watch on 21 November 1944, but Murray's developing a sound contact at 30°10.5'N, 140°20.8'W prompted the frigate's recall. Harrisonlikewise received orders to assist. Murray dropped a pattern of depth charges, but failed to regain contact. Meanwhile, the coastal patrol vessel Amethyst (PYc-3) had picked up a sound contact, prompting Harrison's joining her smaller consort to investigate. While Amethyst remained at the scene of her contact, Pueblo rejoined the destroyers. While Harrison and Murray each took one sector, Pueblo took a third, with John Rodgers, her sound gear having gone out the day before, forming astern. After having investigated a potential submarine contact during the morning and forenoon watches on 21 November, the frigate, in response to orders from Commander TG 15.3, escorted the Eniwetok-bound ammunition tender Alamosa (AK-156) throughout the first and second dog watches and the first watch.
Pueblo rendezvoused with Amethyst at 0931 on 22 November at 29°52'N, 139°53'W, then immediately began steering zig-zag courses, maintaining those courses for the remainder of that day and well into the morning watch on 23 November. At 1349 on that day, Pueblo established a sound contact bearing 140 degrees, so changed course to conform to that of the contact. Comdr. Adams called his crew to battle stations, set condition one and material condition "able." The frigate fired a shallow 13-depth charge pattern soon thereafter at 33°24'N, 133°50'W, followed by a Hedgehog pattern of 24 Mk. 10 projectiles at 1404, and a second 24-charge barrage eight minutes later. Carrying out a search of the waters where she had carried out her attacks, Pueblo observed a whale on the port bow, 3,000 yards away. The frigate continued the sound search into the forenoon watch the following day. Later on the 25th, Pueblorendezvoused with coastal patrol vessel Andradite (PYc-11), and embarked Ens. Lester G. Riggs, A-V(S), for transportation to the U.S. Naval Hospital, Treasure Island. Pueblo passed beneath the Golden Gate Bridge at 0733 on 27 November, through the anti-submarine net at 0742, and moored alongside the North Pier, Treasure Island, at 0818, transferring her passenger ashore within the hour. The ship moved to Pier 54, San Francisco, during the afternoon watch, then returned to North Pier at the start of the second dog watch.
Following a period of repairs during an in-port availability at Treasure Island, Pueblo got underway and calibrated her direction finder in the south reaches of San Francisco Bay on 14 December 1944, returning to her berth later the same day. She conducted combat inspection exercises in those same waters four days later. On 21 December, Pueblo set course to return to Plane Guard Station No.2 (30°N, 140°W), relieving sister ship Grand Forks (PF-11) on the day before Christmas [24 December].
Pueblo remained on station through mid-January 1945, plotting and recording the passage overhead of 422 west-bound flights and 246 east-bound. Relieved by Grand Forks during the first dog watch on 17 January, the frigate sailed for San Francisco. At 0919 the following morning, Pueblo received orders from Commander, Western Sea Frontier, to proceed to 31°06'N, 133°54'W to rescue survivors from a downed plane. Altering course at 0942, Puebloincreased speed and headed for the point indicated. Other units, however, reached the scene first and effected the rescue, so consequently, at 1745, the frigate received direction to proceed to San Francisco.
Reaching Treasure Island at 1449 on 20 January 1945, Pueblo got underway at 0608 on 22 January to proceed to Mare Island, where she discharged ammunition, completing the task in a little under five hours. Shifting to Treasure Island soon thereafter, she underwent repairs into the first week of February. Proceeding thence to Moore Drydock Co., Oakland, Calif., to be drydocked (7-10 February), Pueblo fueled at San Francisco (10-11 February), loaded ammunition at Mare Island (12 February), then returned to Treasure Island.
Underway at 1000 on 15 February 1945, Pueblo relieved Amethyst on Plane Guard Station No.1 (34°N, 131°30'W) the following evening (2131). Between that point and the morning of 24 February, she plotted and recorded the passage overhead of 257 west-bound flights and 53 east-bound. Relieved by patrol vessel Andradite on 24 February, Pueblo returned to Plane Guard Station No.2 and relieved sister ship Casper (PF-12) the next afternoon. The frigate, her SA radar only inoperative for only 17 minutes on 8 March, patrolled her assigned area until 10 March, plotting 34 east-bound flights and 345 headed west. Her place taken by Grand Forks at 0600 on 10 March, Puebloreturned to San Francisco three days later. Following an availability period alongside South Pier, Treasure Island (10-28 March), the ship sailed at 0730 on 28 March to establish Plane Guard Station No.3 at 28°40'N, 142°50'W. Arriving at that position on 31 March, she patrolled that portion of the Pacific until 21 April, logging 240 east-bound flights and 650 west-bound. Relieved by Grand Forks at 1430 on 21 April, Pueblo returned to San Francisco three days later, then shifted to Treasure Island on the 25th to begin an availability that continued through the first week of May 1945.
Following an in-port availability alongside South Pier, Treasure Island (25 April-11 May 1945), Pueblo calibrated her RDF equipment in the southern reaches of San Francisco Bay (11 May) before returning to her berth at South Pier. Soon thereafter, Pueblo operated on 13 and 14 May with the submarine Greenling (SS-213) "conducting scientific experiments," returning to South Pier upon conclusion of those evolutions the first day. Relieved of escorting Greenling by the submarine chaser PC-791, the frigate returned to South Pier on 15 May.
Underway the following morning [16 May 1945], Pueblo relieved sister ship Brownsville (PF-10) on Station "Able"that afternoon. In turn relieved by PC-1238 on the morning of the 24th [1014], Pueblo returned to the familiar confines of South Pier. She shifted to North Pier on the 25th, remaining there until the 27th, when she embarked Rear Adm. William O. Spears, the Director of the Pan-American Division of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, whose "achievements…in his complex and exacting duties"of coordinating the U.S. Navy's work with those of Latin American Republics "had a material effect on the prosecution of the war." In addition to the admiral, the frigate embarked a multinational assemblage of naval and military officers from the U.S., Chinese, Soviet, Brazilian, Chilean and Uruguayan navies, the Hellenic [Greek] Air Force, and from the Chilean and Uruguayan cavalry. In addition, she hosted "several civilian aides and delegates to the United Nations Conference of International Organizations,"included among the latter Senator Thomas T. "Tom" Connally (Democrat - Texas), and former Senator William H. King (Democrat – Utah). Pueblo transported the party of dignitaries to Mare Island Navy Yard, then back to Treasure Island, disembarking them at North Pier at 1730. She shifted back to South Pier (1749-1755), whence she sailed on the morning of 29 May to return to Plane Guard Station No.3.
Pueblo remained at sea on station until 20 June 1945, plotting 171 east-bound flights and 629 west-bound, before turning over patrol duties to Grand Forks. Mooring alongside Brownsville upon her arrival at Treasure Island on the afternoon (1703) of 23 June, the newly arrived frigate began an availability period. Following that period of repairs and the calibration of her equipment on 6 July, Pueblo put to sea and steamed to Plane Guard Station No.2, relievingGrand Island (PF-14) on 8 July. Over the next fortnight, the ship plotted 325 flights heading east and 523 heading west before she turned over her duties to Andradite on 22 July. Shifting to Plane Guard Station No.3 upon Andradite'sarrival, Pueblo relieved sister ship Casper (PF-12) of that duty during the mid watch on 23 July. After plotting 230 east-bound flights and 318 west-bound during her stint on station, Pueblo turned over patrol duties to Brownsville on the afternoon of 30 July, setting course at that point to return to San Francisco.
Reaching Treasure Island on the afternoon of 2 August 1945, Pueblo lay moored to the port side of the South Pier there as hostilities ceased in the Pacific with Japan's acceptance of the terms of the Potsdam Declaration. With the war over, however, the ship's routine remained largely unchanged, as she returned to Plane Guard Station No. 3, relieving Brownsville during the afternoon watch on 22 August. Relieved by Grand Forks on the afternoon of 12 September,Pueblo returned to Treasure Island on the 15th. Underway again on the morning of 3 October, she stood down San Francisco Bay, passing beneath the Golden Gate Bridge at 1107. She rendezvoused with Brownsville, exchanging motion picture film programs with that ship before relieving her on Plane Guard Station No.2. Relieved by that ship on the afternoon of 27 October, Pueblo returned to Treasure Island two days later.
Underway again on 27 November 1945, Pueblo relieved Grand Forks on Plane Guard Station No.3 on 30 November. While at sea, the Chief of Naval Operations assigned Pueblo to Escort Division 41 on 15 December 1945 (effective 1 January 1946, pending her disposal). Relieved by Grand Island on the afternoon of 22 December, three days before Christmas of 1945, the frigate embarked CMM Frank J. Foos, USCG, in serious condition, for urgent hospitalization. Passing beneath the Golden Gate Bridge during the first watch on Christmas Eve, Pueblo moored at 2245, transferring CMM Foos ashore five minutes later.
Underway on 9 January 1946, Pueblo stood down San Francisco Bay, and proceeded out to sea, then maneuvered to rendezvous with Casper mid-way through the afternoon watch on 11 January to transfer men, mail, and medical supplies. Pueblo relieved Grand Forks on Plane Guard Station No.3 the following afternoon. Annapolis (PF-15) in turn relieved Pueblo on 26 January, which then in turn relieved Casper on the early evening of 27 January. Grand Forks relieved Pueblo on 4 February after a movie exchange, then returned to Treasure Island on 6 February. She remained there for the rest of the month. During that time, on 26 February 1946, Commander, Western Sea Frontier, nominated the ship for disposal.
On 13 March 1946, Pueblo departed Treasure Island for Balboa, Canal Zone (C.Z.), arriving on 23 March during the forenoon watch. She entered the isthmian waterway at 1019, and ultimately entered Limon Bay, Colon, C.Z., at 1721, then moored at the U.S. Naval Station, Coco Solo, reporting for duty to Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, upon arrival. Underway on the morning of 26 March, Pueblo sailed from Coco Solo, and ultimately reached Charleston, S.C., mooring alongside the tank landing ship LST-41 at the Clyde Mallory Line's Pier 3 on 31 March, reporting to Commandant, 6th Naval District, for disposal.
Pueblo shifted to the Naval Ammunition Depot, Charleston, on 8 April 1946, then stood down the Cooper River the following day to the Charleston Navy Yard. Moving to the Fuel Pier on 15 April, thence to Pier J-4 on 18 April,Pueblo was taken by the big harbor tugs YTB-544 and YTB-527, and the civilian tugs Hinton and Josephine, and moored in a nest in the Wando River, where, on 25 April she half-masted her colors to mark the passing of Chief Justice Harlan Fiske Stone of the Supreme Court, who had died of a cerebral hemorrhage on the 22nd.
A half hour before the end of the afternoon watch on 26 April 1946, custody of Pueblo was turned over to Commandant, 6th Naval District. Lt. Bernard A. Hyde, USCG, the frigate's last commanding officer, was detached at 1600. Deemed "not essential to the defense of the U.S." a little over a month later, on 27 May 1946, Pueblo was stricken from the Navy Register on 19 June 1946.
Sold to J. C. Berkwitz and Co., New York, N.Y., on 22 September 1947, ex-Pueblo was delivered to the authorized agent for the Marine Contracting and Towing Co., of Charleston. The ship was resold, however, with the Navy's approval, to the government of the Dominican Republic, on 17 September 1948, which renamed her Presidente Troncoso (F.103). Renamed Gregorio Luperòn in 1962, the ship was deleted from the Dominican Navy's list of vessels in 1979. She was broken up subsequently.

Grand Island

A city in Nebraska.

(PF-14: dp. 1,430; l. 304'; b. 38'; dr. 12'; s. 20 k.; a. 33", 240mm.; cl. Tacoma)

Grand Island, a patrol frigate, was originally PG-122 and launched by Kaiser Cargo, Inc., Richmond, Calif., 19 February 1944; as PE-14; sponsored by Mrs. William Shackleton; and commissioned 27 May 1944, Lt. Comdr. H. L. Morgan in command.

After completing her shakedown cruise off the coast of southern California, Grand Island reported for duty with the 12th Naval District 12 September 1944. She subsequently performed weather station and plane guard duty out of San Francisco and participated in several training exercises with patrol forces on the West Coast. She also was engaged from time to time in antisubmarine escort duty. Grand Island departed San Francisco 26 March 1946, arrived Charleston, S.C., 13 April 1946 via the Canal Zone, and was turned over to the 6th Naval District for disposal. She decommissioned 21 May 1946 and was stricken from the Navy Register 19 June. Declared not essential to the defense of the United States, the frigate was turned over to the State Department Foreign Liquidation Corporation and finally transferred to Cuba 16 June 1947, where she serves as Maximo Gomez.


accessed 3 February 2014

United States Navy Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/ accessed 4 February 2014.  Detailed ships history from this site, no information about the AK ships.